Jeter: Impressions of Far Shore Review-This game really doesn’t want me to like it

This is not a comment on Jett: The Far Shore. I began to review the game, and its appearance in multiple PlayStation streaming events raised it to a “fun” state. This is also made by Superbrothers, which is the small team behind the indie game Superbrothers: Sword & Sworcery EP. looks great.


So why is this not a comment on Jett: The Far Shore? simple. Before I reached the end, I was tired of this jet-based exploration game-based gameplay and surprisingly dull world. I found the whole thing quite boring. For me, it was the biggest disappointment of the year. I called it a day in the penultimate chapter of the game.

For most Jett, you are in a kind of hovering plane-jett from the game title. As beauty, you must explore a new world, browse the many interesting items in it and perform the necessary tasks to advance the story. Sadly, jett is the worst thing in the game.

You would think that it would be fun to grab an unexplored world on a ship that can handle various terrains, fly into the air and grab objects with grappling hooks. It is not. Because of the deadly combination of this ship crawling or moving at extremely fast speeds, poor maneuverability, and a camera that likes to repeatedly pull away, simply flying around is often very frustrating.


In these pictures, Jett looks very special, but the jett sequence loses this style and is boring.

In particular, there is an area where you can pick up and launch bomb-like items at the wall. In my video game career, I can’t think of another frustration like this. In the case of severe lag, I got a better gaming experience in cloud gaming.

Although I think this is a very different game, I think the budget is much larger, but Ubisoft’s Starlink handles this kind of aircraft movement very well. The ships in Starlink are fast and agile. Jett feels like it is designed to be stuck on the landscape. This is how I do it, bouncing between the trees like a lost pinball.


Jett has done a lot of work on its thrust system, which ultimately allows you to use steam to cool the engine and maintain top speed, but you are rarely encouraged to actually zoom in beyond the introduction and some tutorials. Usually, you will wander in a monotonous environment, looking for things like a 10-year-old kid on a geographic field trip, who just wants to play Fortnite at home.

When I did not drive the only vehicle with worse handling than the Ever Given container ship, I was doing my best to enjoy the occasional first-person scene when landing. These are extremely linear moments, almost nothing happens, but they are better than the core gaming experience. They sometimes look very stylish and eye-catching, which is much more than that for jet-based world exploration.

The world you explore in Jeter has all the wonders of demolishing the site, which is decorated by a circle of flowers in the center. It’s as if the entire planet is made up of supermarket parking lots built on mountains and flooded areas, and the occasional flower shop somehow survived the end of the world.


There is no doubt that there may be something good here.

After watching Jett’s glimpse, I really want to enjoy it, but this is a game that hurts myself everywhere.A lot of dialogue is required when playing the game, but the game uses Fabricated language With subtitles. I couldn’t concentrate on maneuvering the speedboat and reading all the subtitles, so I either missed the dialogue or had to stop. Fabricated language may be an incredible feat of linguistics, but it does not help make Jett an interesting game.

Sometimes you will be told how to escape from hostile creatures (you can’t fight back in Jett), but you can only read this content if you can’t escape. This is ridiculous. The same goes for general game progress, forcing me to piece together what happened by going to the game’s data file.

I was shocked Jett: The Far Shore rubbed me in such an extreme way and in the wrong way. It turns out that this is the exact opposite of the game I wanted, and to be honest, I feel very sad about it.

Given that I stopped at the end of the penultimate chapter, Jett might turn things around to some extent, but to be honest, I’m very moved that I have kept going. Before you rush to hand in the asking price, please think carefully about Jett: The Far Shore. This is not a game that feels good to play. If you can see through it, it may have something to say, but I really don’t think it’s worth your time.

Disclaimer: Tested on PS5, copy of the game is provided by the publisher. It can also be used on PS4 and PC.